More than 1.5 million acres burned in 9 days in California forcing the evacuation of more than 100,000 people. The fires were caused by extraordinarily unusual lightning strikes, which focused on the San Francisco Bay area. Much of the strikes occurred in a short time period, and with little rain, a phenomenon known as dry lightning. This event comprised about 11 percent of the average annual lightning activity for the state…

No, it’s not global warming, as some media have stated, but a mix of conditions, as dry weather and electric discharges, another event to add to the consequences of a highly charged atmosphere.

It should be mentioned that the extreme weather has worsened California’s Exodus during the last decade. About five million Californians have left the state for a net population loss of more than one million people. Starting in the 1990s, California has been losing more residents to other states than it has gained.

Colorado was also hit by the largest wildfire in the state history. The Pine Gulch fire has burned 139,006 acres and has left ranchers with little to no grazing for cattle and worried about long-term impacts.

And at least 1,216 fires ravaged 8,778 hectares of forests in Algeria. The North African country has experienced more frequent forest fires in recent years but the causes have not been disclosed… negligence? coal traffickers? more lightning strikes? meteorites? Who knows, but something unusual is going on.

Sheets of rain, unusually heavy floods, landslides, and huge hail continued to destroy houses, basic infrastructure, and crops around the world this month… impacting the lives of dozens of millions.

In Asia alone, 17.5 million people suffered the consequences of the record monsoon floods. Nearly 700 died and thousands have been displaced. China, Bangladesh, and India continue to be the most affected.

South Korea has suffered from unusually heavy downpours for more than 2 months now, marking the country’s longest and worst ever monsoon season. Now, the strongest typhoon of the year is on its way to the Korean Peninsula, so the deluge is unlikely to abate anytime soon.

Are you wondering about snow? Ask Australia, South Brazil, and South Africa… well, you could say that it’s normal as they are still in winter (barely), but what about Yunnan, China; Dagestan, Russia; the Alps and Pyrenees in Europe… A little taste of what’s to come?

Given the amount of water falling out of the sky, if things get colder, we may have to prepare ourselves for an extended winter.

All that and more in our SOTT Earth Changes Summary for August 2020.

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